Shame for IEEE, Springer Verlag, ACM, AIP, WorldScientific, Taylor and Francis, Elsevier

For more than 8 years our blog has identified that IEEE, Springer Verlag, ACM, AIP (American Institute of Physics), WorldScientific (Singapore), Taylor and Francis, Elsevier conferences are fake, bogus, scam, sham, mock and predatory. Now we have additional Proofs:

Visit: http://www.nature.com/news/publishers-withdraw-more-than-120-gibberish-papers-1.14763

http://retractionwatch.com/2014/02/24/springer-ieee-withdrawing-more-than-120-nonsense-papers/

or google: IEEE 120 SCIgen Papers

The IEEE SCIgen Papers were 85 two years ago:
http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/71/35/55/PDF/0-FakeDetectionSci-Perso.pdf
Several Blogs (included netdriver.blogpost.com) reported this. In 2014, these SCIgen papers in IEEE were 120.

Let''s start with the IEEE SCIGen Fake Papers of 2009. What's happened in 2009:
In 2009, we had received the following email from a girl that was working in IARIA's secretariat.

IEEE Computer Society Press sent it in January 17 (2009) to all the IEEE Sponsored, Co-Sponsored Conferences as well as to conferences
that publish their Proceedings with IEEE CS Press. It is impressive how many IEEE conferences are based on a review on the Abstract!.


From: EButterfield@computer.org
to: EButterfield@computer.org
cc: ABurgess@computer.org,
John Walz: , Reisman, Sorel" , AStickley@computer.org, TBaldwin@computer.org, r.sterritt@ulster.ac.uk
date Sat, Jan 17, 2009 at 4:03 AMsubject Confidential: Important CPS Message Regarding Fraudulent Machine-Generated Paper Submissions


TO: CPS Clients FROM: Evan Butterfield, Director of Products and Services RE: Fraudulent Machine-Generated Paper Submissions (CONFIDENTIAL) DATE: 16 January 2009

The IEEE Computer Society (CS) has evidence that multiple (IEEE) conferences are receiving machine-generated papers. In two cases, conferences have actually accepted an obviously fraudulent submission. This is a serious issue that threatens the credibility of your conference, the quality of the digital library, and the reputation of both the IEEE and CS. It requires your immediate attention. Please take this opportunity to ensure that your peer review processes are being followed, and adapt to any new requirements that may be communicated by the IEEE or the Computer Society. No conference published by CPS should rely on an abstract review. It is very important that you review carefully the full text of all papers submitted to your conference. If you have already accepted papers, your program committee should review the full text again. While CPS staff will be conducting random spot-checks of conference papers in the publishing queue, we are relying on you to authenticate the content of your proceedings. Any papers that were not actually presented at your conference need to be brought to our attention, and should receive close review. In known cases, the machine-generated origin is obvious from a reading of the first few paragraphs of the paper; the abstracts are human-generated and do not indicate the quality of the paper itself. In the past, papers have been submitted by “Herbert Schlangemann,” but be mindful that the perpetrator of this fraud will change the approach over time. In the event you discover any evidence of questionable content or behavior, please communicate that to us immediately along with an action plan for addressing the problem. Thank you for your help in maintaining the quality of our products.

END OF 2009 IEEE EMAIL

6/12/2009

An interesting post in another blog: IEEE Confess

An interesting post in another blog:
http://bogusconferences.blogspot.com/2009/05/bogus-conferences-ieee-confess.html

Tuesday, 26 May 2009

BOGUS CONFERENCES (IEEE Confess)

See this email from IEEE and publish it
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: EButterfield@computer.org
to: EButterfield@computer.org
cc: ABurgess@computer.org,
John Walz: <johnwalz@ameritech.net>,
"Reisman, Sorel" <sreisman@calstate.edu>, AStickley@computer.org, TBaldwin@computer.org, r.sterritt@ulster.ac.uk

date Sat, Jan 17, 2009 at 4:03 AMsubject Confidential: Important CPS Message Regarding Fraudulent Machine-Generated Paper Submissions


TO: CPS Clients FROM: Evan Butterfield, Director of Products and Services RE: Fraudulent Machine-Generated Paper Submissions (CONFIDENTIAL) DATE: 16 January 2009

The IEEE Computer Society (CS) has evidence that multiple conferences are receiving machine-generated papers.

In two cases, conferences have actually accepted an obviously fraudulent submission.

This is a serious issue that threatens the credibility of your conference, the quality of the digital library, and the reputation of both the IEEE and CS.

It requires your immediate attention.

Please take this opportunity to ensure that your peer review processes are being followed, and adapt to any new requirements that may be communicated by the IEEE or the Computer Society.

No conference published by CPS should rely on an abstract review.
It is very important that you review carefully the full text of all papers submitted to your conference.
If you have already accepted papers, your program committee should review the full text again. While CPS staff will be conducting random spot-checks of conference papers in the publishing queue, we are relying on you to authenticate the content of your proceedings.

Any papers that were not actually presented at your conference need to be brought to our attention, and should receive close review.

In known cases, the machine-generated origin is obvious from a reading of the first few paragraphs of the paper; the abstracts are human-generated and do not indicate the quality of the paper itself.

In the past, papers have been submitted by “Herbert Schlangemann,” but be mindful that the perpetrator of this fraud will change the approach over time.

In the event you discover any evidence of questionable content or behavior, please communicate that to us immediately along with an action plan for addressing the problem.
Thank you for your help in maintaining the quality of our products.

Evan M. Butterfield
Director of Products & Services
IEEE Computer Society10662
Los Vaqueros Circle
Los Alamitos, CA 90720714.816.2165
ebutterfield@computer.org
714.822.9005 mobile

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

What i found in a similar blog:
http://bogus-conferences.blogspot.com/
is:

Denis Baggi, Chairman, IEEE CS confessed, according to a comment on the Schlangemann Blog, that "Selection criteria such a refereeing etc. are meaningless", probably means that IEEE has accepted the unreliability and bogosity of its conferences. Denis Baggi also adds: "Articles should be written only if someone has something to tell others, in which case the validity of the paper is obvious",
http://bogus-conferences.blogspot.com/

Anonymous said...

Then, I wll not send again papers to IEEE co-sponsored conferences...

The whole story

Most of us associate spam with penis enlargement and get-rich-quick schemes. But many graduate students in computer science are being driven crazy by e-mail appeals to send papers to academic conferences that they believe exist primarily to make money.

Three graduate students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology decided to do something about it. They created a computer program that would link together random scientific phrases, graphs and charts -- and they used the program to submit a bogus paper to a conference, which accepted it. Now that the graduate students are sharing their program, the bogus paper, and their acceptance letter with the world on a Web Site, the conference has uninvited them and unaccepted the paper. But the students think they have made their point.

In 2008 and 2009, several computer generated (gibberish) conference articles, with fictitious authors, appeared in IEEE Xplore Data Base coming from many IEEE Sponsored events. Other poor quality conference articles have also, occasionally, appeared in IEEE Confererences and consequently in IEEE Xplore. The IEEE itself accepted (see http://www.ieee.org/web/aboutus/corporate/board/ad_hoc_committees/qualityofconferencepapers.html )that such articles hurt the reputation of IEEE and destroyed confidence in the quality of IEEE publications. IEEE tried to find solutions against this vulnerability but in vain, because many more bogus papers appeared in the next months (see http://iaria-highsci.blogspot.com and http://blog.marcelotoledo.org/2008/12/26/how-can-someone-trust-ieee )

6/04/2009

Many people protest for the bogus papers in IEEE

Many people protest for the bogus papers in IEEE

http://danushka-menikkumbura.blogspot.com/2008/12/software-generated-paper-accepted-at.html

They say:

I discovered that in May of 2009 also two new outbreaks of fake papers appeared in IEEE:

Please take careful note of the information below
about this IEEE Computational Complexity conference
It is another FAKE IEEE conference (fake IEEE spamference) this time on Computational Complexity.
The organizers are academic criminals.
Do NOT send these criminals any money.
Please send this warning on to your networks.
Many young people have been defrauded lately - and we must work together to defeat such efforts.
Use extreme caution when applying for conferences advertised by organizations unknown to you.
What a Shame for the IEEE Computational Complexity Conference!
two new bogus papers have been accepted in the http://facweb.cs.depaul.edu/jrogers/complexity/accepted.html


Extractors for varieties ??????????by Zeev Dvir !!!

andExtractors for Low-Weight Affine Sources ??????? byAnup Rao

These 2 papers are absolutely fake papers.

What a Shame for the IEEE Computational Complexity Spamference!

http://danushka-menikkumbura.blogspot.com/2008/12/software-generated-paper-accepted-at.html

We have just found another Blog with similar ideas

We have just found another Blog with similar ideas
http://acapam.blogspot.com/